“Accurate but Incomplete”

“It’s sadly easy to reverse meaning, in fact, to tell a lie, by offering an accurate but incomplete quote,”1 said author Octavia Butler in an Essence article in 2000. After reading this article, I began to think about Louis’ life; how his collections have humanized the man from the legend the world thought they knew... Continue Reading →

Armstrong’s Fan Club – Part I

I would like to think that if I had lived during Louis Armstrong’s time and had the opportunity to meet him, I would know how to act and what to say. However, based on my previous interactions with certain contemporary musicians during official and unofficial “meet and greets,” I am not certain I would be... Continue Reading →

Armstrong’s “Social Networks”

On the Louis Armstrong House Museum’s (LAHM) digital collections webpage, I keep a folder entitled “Random Items” that holds a group of interesting but unrelated digitized archival objects. This past week I re-examined some of the objects in the folder, which includes a 1968 telegram written by Armstrong that mentions Barbra Streisand’s voice, a photo... Continue Reading →

Fragmented Stories in Perspective

The Palace of Stories. That’s the name my friends and I settled on calling our first floor, two-bedroom/ basement apartment located in a modern gentrified Brooklyn building. We made it official by making it our WIFI name, so whenever someone visited and needed access, those words would display on their setting options in bold letters.... Continue Reading →

Nonviolent Direct Art (NDA)

My last post ended with the possibility of considering the use of artistic and social practices as a way to engage in nonviolent direct action; specifically referencing the concept from the philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. I have chosen to use this term because when it is in reference to groups that were... Continue Reading →

Listening to Louis – Part II

Listening to Louis as an ethnomusicologist Do I listen to Louis as an ethnomusicologist? This is a question I have been pondering since my last blog post in which I described the act of listening to Louis as a deeply personal experience that evokes an emotional response. I appreciate that my undergraduate and graduate ethnomusicology... Continue Reading →

Grey Spaces

It was the invitation to “engage in a nonviolent direct action program,”1 that brought Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to Birmingham, Alabama in April of 1963. In his letter written from the Birmingham Jail, he explains in detail the need for the direct action program, as “Birmingham is probably the most thoroughly segregated city in... Continue Reading →

Listening to Louis – Part I

Listening to Louis in “my little corner of the world” It is another day. I walk into my living room, where my beat-up black Ikea desk rests against one of the walls. I open my laptop, turn on my desk lamp, check my email, look over my list of “to-dos,” and begin my work. During... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑